I Got a Rock…

Most of you are familiar with a famous cartoon character named Charlie. On Halloween, Charlie and his friends step up to the neighbor’s door and yell, “Trick or Treat!”  The neighbor tosses  various sizes and shapes of treats into their bags. As they move away from the door, the kids begin to size up what treats they received. “I got gum, I got chocolate…!”
halloween-1773447_1920Lastly, Charlie says quietly with disappointment, “I got a rock.”   This not only happens once, but three times!  And, with equal tone and doom, Charlie begins to personify the heaviness of the drop in his bag.

In life, we meet many Charlies that could relate to this unlucky Halloween experience.  Do you see the friend at work who always gets overlooked for a promotion? How about a sister or brother who thinks that the cycle of not being included will never end? Or the boss who never sees the good things you do? Do you see a wee bit of yourself in Charlie?

Charlie tried to see the positive in life, yet doom seemed to follow him everywhere. Even his dog made fun of him.  What was missing from Charlie’s life that all his friends seemed to have mastered?

On the outside, we seem to do a good job of masking our feelings that occur deep inside us.  For Charlie, even his Halloween costume portrayed his internal woe of doom.  His ghost sheet full of holes screamed, “I am a failure!”  It reflected how he carried himself in his outer world.  If you know of someone who can relate, they could be wearing the same costume without realizing it. But there is hope!

Each of us possesses a core mindset where we can choose to feel like a rock or a gem. When we are able to develop this new type of thinking,  we can learn from our”rock,” about what we portray, what we say, how we say it, what we see as constant gloom and doom, the types of friends we attract, failure, lack of focus.

When we embrace our emotional existence, we can learn to move our internal negative self-talk from a rock to a gem with language changing to positive:

” I constantly say I’m a failure” to “I am a winner;” or ” I don’t make a lot of money;” to “I am grateful to have a roof over my head and food in my stomach.”

The “rock language” changes to “gem language.”The gem we create and embrace becomes who we are truly meant to be: loving,  giving, thankful creatures of the planet.  diamond-2028549_1280

We begin to feel more beauty in our space, opportunities open up, we smile more, people take notice. We see simple things for the first time that are simply beautiful!

So! The next time you are thrown a rock, what will your choice be?  Rock or Gem?harvest-moon-1828012_1920

Pardon me, as I stir my tea with a stick of rock candy…(beastly howl!Bwahaha!!).

                         Happy Halloween!

HippyKat

Kat Kohler Schwartz is a Core Alignment Mentor and founder of Salt of the Earth Holistic Wellness in St. Louis, MO, USA.

Kat mentors women who face difficult challenges in life which include relationships at home, work, and socially.  She specializes in Neuro Linguistic Programming and Emotional Wisdom Training.

She offers phone mentoring, group sessions, and face-to-face with aromatherapy and energy work.

Contact:  livingmywisdom@gmail.com  or call 314-359-2467

 

 

 

 

Some Day I’m Going to…

By Kat Kohler Schwartz                                                                                                                 Founder/Core Alignment Mentor at Salt of the Earth Holistic Wellness, LLC

Have you ever caught yourself looking at lists of classes online that you always wanted to take? Like pottery, writing, carpentry, or painting? Or it might be a place you always wanted to visit. Like the majestic, snow covered mountains in Switzerland, or the sandy, serene beaches of the Caribbean. Or, perhaps, you just want to relax and catch up on all the books you’ve always wanted to read.

What is important to you that you are not doing right now?

I was helping a friend, Christine, move some seasonal clothes from the basement to the upstairs. We stopped for a moment at her sewing room while she showed me her latest projects. They ranged from clothes for the grandkids to the beautiful quilt she had been working on.

As I gazed around the room I could not help but notice the piles and piles of fabric in various patterns and colors of blue, red, bright greens and shades of yellows. She had them stacked in bags, totes, and proceeded to open a large storage closet packed with more bolts and folded pieces of fabric. It was overwhelming to me.

I had to ask, “Christine, what are you going to do with all of these gorgeous pieces of fabric?” She smiled, looked down at the open work on the table, and responded, “Well, after I get done with these three projects, some day I will get around to those projects,” as she pointed to the stacked containers. She had enough material to keep her going for the rest of her life and mine combined!

Knowing that Christine had always been a resourceful person, it seemed important for her to have these sewing projects. It exercised her mind, her body, and her drive. Sewing kept her alive inside. Her husband had fallen ill and she could not get outside their home like she used to. They were aging, but Christine still had the spark of dreaming. However, she had satisfied herself by doing things she liked without leaving home.

Becoming interested in how she thought about the state of things at home, I asked her, “What else do you want to do?” Sheepishly, she answered, “I’d like to travel, some day, or take up yoga, Tai Chi, or pottery.”

As she uttered those words, “some day,” again. I suddenly became aware that I have heard those words quite often among friends, in family discussions, in the workplace, and, well…I’ve heard it a LOT! Realizing that Christine had just turned 81, I curiously asked, “What does ‘some day’ mean to you?”

Again, she smiled, but this time reflected on my question a bit longer. Christine sat quietly for a moment, then responded, “Well, I guess I’ve run out of ‘some days’ haven’t I?” Chuckling, she looked up at me from her chair, her hazel eyes still twinkling. Slowly, her face became very solemn and she gazed down at her sewing work. She was feeling the reality of her limited time left on this earth. I touched something deep inside her….and me.

Christine’s response stopped me in my tracks. “Some day” was a phrase that I had used often. Some day I will lose weight, some day I will sing with a choir, some day I will take up yoga, some day I will meditate, some day I will visit places I’ve never been. Yes, I wanted the some of the same things as Christine, but I wanted much more than to still be dreaming it when I age to 80 years old. I wanted it to become reality. Christine’s message was a gift.

What do you mean when you say those words, “some day?” I’ve heard them in many a conversation at the water fountain at work, or standing in line at the coffee shop. So, what emotions do you notice when you say these words? What do they mean? Are you willing to explore the reasons for what keeps you from your dreams?

I know that I never want to run out of “some days,” so I now show up for myself when those words haunt my mind. I think of Christine, dreaming all of her 81 years and now the reality of her dreams has become limited. Knowing that my days could end tomorrow or next week keeps me motivated to continue to work towards those things I put off for “some day.”

In fact, I no longer say those words. I owe it to myself. Dreams do come true…

What is important to YOU?

What dreams are you holding onto for “some day?”

 

Kat Kohler Schwartz is a Core Alignment Mentor and founder of Salt of the Earth Holistic Wellness.

“I bring light from dark situations to create a sacred place of peace that is rooted in the heart.”

Kat practices Neuro Linguistic Programming and Emotional Wisdom Training.

She offers group workshops in the U.S. and worldwide phone sessions. Contact: livingmywisdom@gmail.com 314-359-2467